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Residential Natural Gas Use

This indicator shows the residential natural gas usage measured in therms per capita for the region.

Residential Natural Gas Use

133.9
152.6
Comparison: CA Counties 

131.2

therms
Measurement Period: 2011

County: San Bernardino

Categories: Environment / Energy & Sustainability, Environment / Weather & Global Warming
Technical Note: The distribution is based on data from 49 California counties and population estimates from the U.S. Census.
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute
Last Updated: December 2012
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Why is this important?

Slightly more than half of the homes in the U.S. use natural gas as their main heating fuel. Natural gas is a relatively clean fossil fuel. Compared to oil and coal, the combustion of natural gas releases less sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, and virtually no ash or particulate matter. Natural gas combustion does produce carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. Consequently, the combustion of natural gas does contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and to changes in the earth's carbon cycle and climate.

Natural gas also affects the environment when it is produced, stored and transported. Because natural gas is made up mostly of methane (another greenhouse gas), small amounts of methane can sometimes leak into the atmosphere from wells, storage tanks and pipelines.

Climate change threatens health through more extreme weather events, increased air pollution, limitations on food production, increased water-borne and food-borne illnesses, and increased infectious disease vectors. For the major fossil fuels, the amounts of carbon dioxide produced for each billion Btu (British thermal units) of heat energy extracted are: 208,000 pounds for coal, 164,000 pounds for petroleum products, and 117,000 pounds for natural gas. Because natural gas is non-renewable and has relatively better environmental performance as a fuel, it will be important to conserve natural gas for the future.

Residential Natural Gas Use : Time Series

2006: 133.2 2007: 129.1 2008: 128.6 2009: 127.0 2010: 132.1 2011: 131.2

therms

Residential Natural Gas Use

Comparison: Prior Value 

131.2

therms
Measurement Period: 2011

County: San Bernardino

Categories: Environment / Energy & Sustainability, Environment / Weather & Global Warming
Technical Note: The trend is a comparison between the most recent and previous measurement periods. Confidence intervals were not taken into account in determining the direction of the trend.
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute
Last Updated: December 2012

Why is this important?

Slightly more than half of the homes in the U.S. use natural gas as their main heating fuel. Natural gas is a relatively clean fossil fuel. Compared to oil and coal, the combustion of natural gas releases less sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, and virtually no ash or particulate matter. Natural gas combustion does produce carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. Consequently, the combustion of natural gas does contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and to changes in the earth's carbon cycle and climate.

Natural gas also affects the environment when it is produced, stored and transported. Because natural gas is made up mostly of methane (another greenhouse gas), small amounts of methane can sometimes leak into the atmosphere from wells, storage tanks and pipelines.

Climate change threatens health through more extreme weather events, increased air pollution, limitations on food production, increased water-borne and food-borne illnesses, and increased infectious disease vectors. For the major fossil fuels, the amounts of carbon dioxide produced for each billion Btu (British thermal units) of heat energy extracted are: 208,000 pounds for coal, 164,000 pounds for petroleum products, and 117,000 pounds for natural gas. Because natural gas is non-renewable and has relatively better environmental performance as a fuel, it will be important to conserve natural gas for the future.

Residential Natural Gas Use : Time Series

2006: 133.2 2007: 129.1 2008: 128.6 2009: 127.0 2010: 132.1 2011: 131.2

therms